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What makes a good life with longevity?

Ever been intrigued by the nuances of happiness? Robert Waldinger illuminates this very quest, and his captivating TED talk on YouTube—based on an epic Harvard study spanning over seven decades—offers profound insights. As we journey ahead, we uncover the exhilarating scientific prospects of living up to 200 years, powered by luminaries in the longevity field. And for those yearning for simple, actionable advice, the humble act of brisk walking emerges as a promising key to heart health and lifespan.
Images representing a balanced, longevity-boosting lifestyle.
Longevity Lifestyle Choices: Daily Habits for Extended Vitality.

Good Morning,

Venturing into this week’s exploration of longevity, our digest beckons with compelling narratives and transformative revelations. 

Ever been intrigued by the nuances of happiness? Robert Waldinger illuminates this very quest, and his captivating TED talk on YouTube—based on an epic Harvard study spanning over seven decades—offers profound insights. As we journey ahead, we uncover the exhilarating scientific prospects of living up to 200 years, powered by luminaries in the longevity field. And for those yearning for simple, actionable advice, the humble act of brisk walking emerges as a promising key to heart health and lifespan.

Every day’s a school day …


What makes a good life? (Youtube: TED)

In a captivating quest to decode happiness, Harvard University launched the longest study on the subject in the 1930s. Including both Harvard sophomores and teens from Boston’s poorest areas, the research spanned over 75 years. Robert Waldinger, the fourth director, unpacks the study’s revelations in his TED talk, amassing over 20 million views.

Contrary to popular belief that fame and fortune are happiness keystones, Waldinger accentuates three lessons: 1) Social connections are paramount for health and happiness, while loneliness is detrimental. 2) Quality trumps quantity when it comes to close connections for well-being. 3) Nurturing good relationships benefits both our bodies and minds. So, are our social ties the real elixir of a fulfilling life?

Will you live to 200? (Forbes)

Could we see humans living up to 200 years in the foreseeable future?

Sergey Young of the Longevity Vision Fund believes so, and he points to several astonishing breakthroughs in longevity research. Dr. David Sinclair’s team, for instance, has rejuvenated cells and even restored vision in glaucoma-afflicted mice. Then there’s LyGenesis, who are not just studying organs but actually regrowing them within lymph nodes, potentially changing the game for those in need of transplants.

Elon Musk’s venture, Neuralink, isn’t just about the future of tech but our brains, imagining a world where we mentally control devices. Dr. Greg Fahy offers a tantalizing glimpse into age reversal through an epigenetic clock. And, not to be overlooked, the emergence of prime editing is setting the stage for genome-level cures to many diseases.

These discoveries, each unique in its own right, collectively propel our quest to combat aging.

Go for a Brisk Walk this Weekend (Innovative Healthcare)

Embarking on brisk walks for roughly four miles once or twice a week could boost longevity and enhance cardiovascular durability, suggests a recent study from UCLA. Examining data from the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which tracked over 3,100 adults, researchers discovered that individuals who achieved 8,000 steps (approx. 4 miles) one or two times weekly faced lower all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates compared to inactive counterparts.

Interestingly, the health benefits from such walks appear to plateau at about three times a week, with little added advantage from increased frequency. As wearable devices and step-tracking apps rise in popularity, such findings underscore that even seemingly modest step goals can yield significant health gains. So, for those finding it challenging to integrate daily exercise, achieving those steps just a couple of days might be a beneficial stride forward.


As we wind down this week’s odyssey into the enigma of longevity, several contemplations rise to the fore.

We’ve delved deep into the profound mysteries of human happiness, grounded in decades of rigorous research, traversed the groundbreaking scientific strides inching us closer to seemingly mythical lifespans, and appreciated the simple yet powerful acts that might tip the longevity scales in our favor.

In the timeless quest for longevity and fulfillment, let us continually cherish our connections, celebrate the marvels of modern science, and honor the everyday rituals that fortify our well-being.

Enjoy your walk,

The Longr Reads Team.


“Walk and be happy; walk and be healthy. The best way to lengthen out our days is to walk steadily and with a purpose.”

Charles Dickens, Novelist


Longr Reads’ of the Week

  • Andrew Huberman Lab Podcast w/ Dr Peter Attia (Youtube)
  • Some claim human lifespans can be lengthened indefinitely (The Economist)
  • Longevity Clinics: What They Are, Services & More (Spannr)
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